Automobile Industry

Dealers Are Worried They’re Running Out Of Trucks To Sell

People are buying trucks that are temporarily not in production.

Although there are early signs of an uplift in the automotive industry after Europe’s timid attempts to ease the coronavirus lockdown, the pre-crisis levels of sales and production probably won’t be recovered for months, if not years. It turns out not all dealers are facing difficulties to sell their products, which – in turn – creates another issue.

As we reported yesterday, despite the coronavirus outbreak, tens of thousands of customers in the United States still rushed to showrooms to buy a new truck last month. In fact, pickups outsold cars in April with 186,000 units delivered in the country versus just over 169,000 passenger cars in the same timeframe. A new report indicates that this trend might turn into a problem as dealers are slowly running out of trucks in stock.

According to Automotive News, quoting data

Read More

Why coronavirus could turn Britain into a cycling nation

Within the next few weeks, millions of us are going to face a choice which could have far-reaching consequences for this country.  With lockdown set to be eased, but with social distancing likely to remain in place for the foreseeable future, we are going to have to decide how we get about. 

Do we take public transport, knowing the risks involved in terms of spreading Covid-19? Rely on our cars? Do we use alternative means of transport and if so, which ones?

Or could coronavirus be the trigger to turn Britain into a cycling nation? 

No one is saying we are going to be like the Dutch or the Danes overnight. At the moment, both statistically and culturally, we are light years behind our European neighbours. In the Netherlands a whopping 26 percent of all journeys are made by bike. In Denmark the figure is close to 20

Read More

Camera Car Picks Up Odd Jobs To Make Ends Meet During Coronavirus

Something to lighten the mood during this adverse situation.

The coronavirus pandemic has put the world in a halt. The automotive industry, for example, has been greatly affected in many parts of the world, not just in sales but also in manufacturing due to plant shutdowns.

As of date, there are 4.7 million cases of COVID-19 worldwide, which resulted in 285,000 deaths. 1.45 million has recovered from the disease, thankfully. Several countries have flattened the curve in their own way, but there are some that still need to take action, including the United States.

While a lot of automakers have resumed or have announced the resumption of operations amid easing of the lockdown, there are still many industries that face challenges, including the film industry.

 

To lighten up the mood, Jeff Hartman from Facebook has posted a short film about a camera car finding odd jobs to make ends

Read More

Semiconductor-based electronics make up 40% of a car’s cost

27 February 2020, Bavaria, Regensburg: A Continental employee checks a circuit board for a vehicle control unit in the electronics production department at the Continental plant. (Photo by Armin Weigel/picture alliance via Getty Images)

 

A new white paper from consulting firm Deloitte on the semiconductor industry puts hard numbers to the cost of semiconductors and electronics in the automotive industry. Any auto enthusiast could have correctly guessed the trend based on the annual list of new tech features showing up in entry-level and flagship offerings. The marquee number is likely still a surprise: as summarized by Car and Driver, the paper notes that as of 2017, electronics systems powered by semiconductor-based chips comprised 40% of the cost of a new car. That was up from 18% in 2000, 20% in 2007, and is projected to reach 45% come 2030. The cost of the base semiconductors that enable the systems

Read More