car

The evolution of the Corvette from America’s sports car to a global powerhouse

All eight generations of the Chevrolet Corvette.
All eight generations of the Chevrolet Corvette.

Chevrolet

  • For almost 70 years, the Chevrolet Corvette was a front-engined sports car.

  • It was a great performer, but was missing that one last element that’d make it competitive in the global sports-car market.

  • The 2020 Corvette is now mid-engined and a worthy international competitor.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories

Despite the generous offering of American muscle cars available to buyers today, there’s only one considered to be America’s sports car. That car is the Chevrolet Corvette.

The Corvette is currently in its eighth generation — and for the first time in its 67-year history, it finally has the setup that makes it competitive with the likes of the European supercars. 

See, for the first seven generations, the Corvette stuck with a very traditional, front-engine layout, meaning its engine was located in front of the driver. Of course, there’s nothing inherently

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Scrappage scheme may fail to rev up British car makers

A scrappage scheme offering motorists up to £6,000 to trade in old petrol or diesel cars for a new electric vehicle would do little to bolster British carmakers, experts have warned.

The plan, which is being considered by Prime Minister Boris Johnson as he seeks to rev up the automotive industry following a lockdown sales collapse and a run of redundancies, would do little to help the UK’s biggest carmaker Jaguar Land Rover.

JLR’s only all-electric car, the I-Pace, is built in Austria by contract manufacturer Magna, meaning pumping UK state funds into the proposal would do little to save British jobs.

The firm has about 40,000 UK staff and is planning to build electric versions of its Jaguar saloons at a plant in Castle Bromwich in the West Midlands, but the first of these will not come until next year. The crisis in the industry could derail the

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Self-driving cars still won’t prevent the most common car accidents, according to a new study

A fleet of Uber's self-driving test vehicles in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
A fleet of Uber’s self-driving test vehicles in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Kyodo News Stills via Getty Images

  • Self-driving car technology has long been lauded for its ability to prevent crashes related to human error.

  • So the logic goes: If you remove people from the equation, far fewer crashes will happen.

  • But that doesn’t take into account the unexpected, a new study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says, nor does it account for the way that self-driving systems are built.

  • About two-thirds of all crashes in the study would still have occurred even if every car on the road were a “fully self-driving” vehicle.

  • “For self-driving vehicles to live up to their promise of eliminating most crashes,” the study says, “they will have to be designed to focus on safety rather than rider preference when those two are at odds.”

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In the not-so-distant

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Camera Car Picks Up Odd Jobs To Make Ends Meet During Coronavirus

Something to lighten the mood during this adverse situation.

The coronavirus pandemic has put the world in a halt. The automotive industry, for example, has been greatly affected in many parts of the world, not just in sales but also in manufacturing due to plant shutdowns.

As of date, there are 4.7 million cases of COVID-19 worldwide, which resulted in 285,000 deaths. 1.45 million has recovered from the disease, thankfully. Several countries have flattened the curve in their own way, but there are some that still need to take action, including the United States.

While a lot of automakers have resumed or have announced the resumption of operations amid easing of the lockdown, there are still many industries that face challenges, including the film industry.

 

To lighten up the mood, Jeff Hartman from Facebook has posted a short film about a camera car finding odd jobs to make ends

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