emissions

Coalition abandons U.S. legal battle with Calif. over emissions standards

The Coalition for Sustainable Automotive Regulation, a group representing automakers and dealers, is withdrawing from a lawsuit between California and the federal government over the state’s authority to set its own emissions standards, the group said Tuesday.

“We are aligned with the Biden Administration’s goals to achieve year-over-year improvements in fuel economy standards that provide meaningful climate and national energy security benefits, reduce GHG emissions and promote advanced technologies,” the coalition said. “In a gesture of good faith and to find a constructive path forward, the CSAR has decided to withdraw from this lawsuit in order to unify the auto industry behind a single national program, with ambitious, achievable standards.”

The action comes after President Joe Biden issued an executive order on Jan. 20 directing the Department of Transportation and the EPA to reconsider the Trump administration’s 2019 decision to revoke California’s authority to restrict tailpipe emissions by April and

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With emissions deal, California takes aim at automakers’ alliance with Trump

California finalized its agreements with five major automakers aimed at upholding its stringent vehicle emissions standards against an effort by the Trump administration to roll the rules back.” data-reactid=”23″On Aug. 17, California finalized its agreements with five major automakers aimed at upholding its stringent vehicle emissions standards against an effort by the Trump administration to roll the rules back.

In doing so, the state delivered an unmistakable warning to the rest of the auto industry: California’s rules are likely to remain in place, and if you’ve got brains, you’ll join us.

The state carefully crafted its agreements with Ford, Honda, BMW of North America, Volkswagen Group of America and Volvo to keep them free from interference by the federal Environmental Protection Agency or anyone else in the Trump administration.

Both we and the companies consider this to be an enforceable agreement.

Mary Nichols, chair, California Air Resources Board

Those

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