accidents

Self-driving cars still won’t prevent the most common car accidents, according to a new study

A fleet of Uber's self-driving test vehicles in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
A fleet of Uber’s self-driving test vehicles in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Kyodo News Stills via Getty Images

  • Self-driving car technology has long been lauded for its ability to prevent crashes related to human error.

  • So the logic goes: If you remove people from the equation, far fewer crashes will happen.

  • But that doesn’t take into account the unexpected, a new study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says, nor does it account for the way that self-driving systems are built.

  • About two-thirds of all crashes in the study would still have occurred even if every car on the road were a “fully self-driving” vehicle.

  • “For self-driving vehicles to live up to their promise of eliminating most crashes,” the study says, “they will have to be designed to focus on safety rather than rider preference when those two are at odds.”

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In the not-so-distant

Read More