Chip

Porsche CEO warns of ‘very serious’ global chip shortage

Porsche’s chief executive warned on Monday that the German luxury automaker’s daily operations could be affected over the coming months by a “very serious” global semiconductor shortage.

“The semiconductor topic is a very serious one because the whole industry is affected because of the big demand of consumer electronics and the faster return of the automotive sector,” Oliver Blume, chief executive of Porsche, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Monday.

“We could be affected every day, so we watch very deeply (over) the next days and months what we can do. We have to relax short term and look for measures long term.”

His comments come after a sudden upsurge in global car sales late last year coincided with a shortfall of essential chip components. The supply shortages brought assembly lines of the chip-reliant car industry to a standstill and halted the production of hundreds of thousands of vehicles worldwide.

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Texas Power Failures Shut Chip Factories, Squeezing Tight Supply

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3 Stocks Flashing Signs of Strong Insider Buying

For an individual investor to beat the market, you need an edge. Investing strategies come in different forms and you can rely on several factors to achieve the end goal of strong returns. Be it following analyst ratings, upcoming catalysts or recognizing the latest market moving trends. There is another option: following the signal from those in the know – the corporate insiders. These are the company officers whose positions give them both access to frequently privileged information on business plans and finances and the experience necessary to translate that into smart stock trades. And better yet – they are not wholly free actors. Being responsible to shareholders and Boards of Directors for company profits, these insiders cannot use their inside knowledge for selfish purposes. Which means that following their stock trades, especially of their own companies, can be a viable

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Biden Team Pressing Taiwan, Allies on Auto Chip Shortfall

(Bloomberg) — President Joe Biden’s top economic adviser, Brian Deese, has sought the Taiwanese government’s help resolving a global semiconductor shortage that’s idling U.S. car manufacturing plants, according to a letter reviewed by Bloomberg News.

In the letter, Deese thanked Taiwan’s minister of economic affairs, Wang Mei-hua, for her personal engagement on the microchips shortage and relayed concerns from U.S. automotive companies.

Deese’s letter shows that top White House officials have become involved in trying to resolve the shortage, which has presented an early challenge to Biden’s administration. Deese, the director of the National Economic Council, as well as National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan are both personally engaged in the effort to address bottlenecks in auto companies’ supply chains, a White House spokesperson said.

The spokesperson asked not to be identified by name because the talks have been private. Wang told reporters Thursday that she hasn’t received a letter from

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How Covid led to a $60 billion global chip shortage for automakers

This photo shows Ford 2018 and 2019 F-150 trucks on the assembly line at the Ford Motor Company’s Rouge Complex on September 27, 2018 in Dearborn, Michigan.

Jeff Kowalsky | AFP | Getty Images

Automakers across the globe are expected to lose billions of dollars in earnings this year due to a shortage of semiconductor chips, a situation that’s expected to worsen as companies battle for supplies of the critical parts.

Consulting firm AlixPartners expects the shortage will cut $60.6 billion in revenue from the global automotive industry this year. That conservative estimate includes the entire supply chain — from dealers and automakers to large tier-1 suppliers and their smaller counterparts, according to Dan Hearsch, a managing director in the New York-based firm’s automotive and industrial practice.

“All the way up and down the supply chain, everybody is out some portion of money,” he said. “This could be 10% of

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