Selfdriving

Elon Musk reveals another Tesla “Full Self-Driving” price increase

Tesla may be credited for turning the automotive industry on its head and pushing forward battery-powered cars and power solutions, but that might not be what it’s remembered for. Company CEO Elon Musk has long been promising a future of fully autonomous cars, but its Full Self-Driving (FSD) feature, despite the name, barely makes the grade. The capability has been one of Tesla’s most controversial features, and the controversy just keeps coming with this latest pre-announcement from Musk.

Image: Tesla

Tesla cars have two features with names that spark the imagination and, at the same time, engender some confusion. Autopilot, a standard feature on all its models, offers basic driver assistance like automatic emergency braking, while the optional Full Self-Driving package adds more on top, including automatic lane changing and “smart summon.” The two names have been criticized as misleading, as drivers presume they can keep their hands off the

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Waymo’s leadership shift spotlights self-driving car challenges

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Waymo, Alphabet’s self-driving car subsidiary, has reshuffled its top executive lineup. John Krafcik, Waymo’s CEO since 2015, announced on April 2 that he would be stepping down from his role. Krafcik is being replaced by former COO Tekedra Mawakana and former CTO Dmitri Dolgov and will remain as an advisor to the company.

“[With] the fully autonomous Waymo One ride-hailing service open to all in our launch area of Metro Phoenix, and with the fifth generation of the Waymo Driver being prepared for deployment in ride-hailing and goods delivery, it’s a wonderful opportunity for me to pass the baton to Tekedra and Dmitri as Waymo’s co-CEOs,” Krafcik wrote on LinkedIn.

John Krafcik Waymo CEO

Above: John Krafcik, former CEO of Waymo, Alphabet’s self-driving car subsidiary.

The change in leadership could have significant implications for Waymo, which

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Luminar Is Overhyped: These Self-Driving Car Stocks Are Better Buys Right Now

It has been a banner year for stocks of companies that want to disrupt the automotive industry, and Luminar Technologies (NASDAQ:LAZR) is the latest to ride the wave.

Luminar is a maker of lidar, a technology that uses pulsed laser beams to measure distances that are used in most self-driving concepts. The company went public on Dec. 3 through a reverse merger and the stock almost immediately doubled in value.

Investors are excited about the potential of the technology to help make robocars a reality. Alas the lidar market is getting somewhat crowded, and Luminar has a lot to prove in the quarters ahead to justify those sorts of gains. 

The potential is real, but the markets are getting way ahead of themselves in terms of the valuation. Here’s why three Fools believe General Motors (NYSE:GM), Velodyne Lidar (NASDAQ:VLDR), and XPeng

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Self-driving cars still won’t prevent the most common car accidents, according to a new study

A fleet of Uber's self-driving test vehicles in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
A fleet of Uber’s self-driving test vehicles in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Kyodo News Stills via Getty Images

  • Self-driving car technology has long been lauded for its ability to prevent crashes related to human error.

  • So the logic goes: If you remove people from the equation, far fewer crashes will happen.

  • But that doesn’t take into account the unexpected, a new study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says, nor does it account for the way that self-driving systems are built.

  • About two-thirds of all crashes in the study would still have occurred even if every car on the road were a “fully self-driving” vehicle.

  • “For self-driving vehicles to live up to their promise of eliminating most crashes,” the study says, “they will have to be designed to focus on safety rather than rider preference when those two are at odds.”

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In the not-so-distant

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